Phonological Awareness Continuum

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The phonological awareness continuum refers to the general advancement of instruction and learning in the sounds of language, moving from alliteration and rhyming through segmenting sentences, syllables, onset and rime. Instruction and learning typically begin in the home with simple songs, nursery rhymes, and word play, and advance through first grade as children manipulate phonemes to decode and create words.

Alliteration refers to recognizing and producing words that have the same beginning sound. Examples of instructional activities for alliteration include:

Rhyming refers to recognizing and producing words that have the same ending sounds. Examples of instructional activities for alliteration include:

Segmenting sentences refers to being able to separate a sentence into words. Examples of instructional activities for segmenting include:

Syllables refer to blending or segmenting syllables into words. Examples of instructional activities for syllables include:

Onset and rime refers to blending or segmenting words by the initial consonant or consonant cluster and the vowel and consonant after the initial sound. Examples of instructional activities for onset and rime include:

 

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Phonological Awareness Strategies

 

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Name
Phonological Awareness Planning Guide
Say It Move It
Elkonia Box
Activity Cards

Resources